Swaziland is world’s most unequal country

According to a new briefing paper, published by British charitable organization, Oxfam, Swaziland is the world’s most unequal country, followed by Nigeria, Namibia and South Africa.

The Oxfam briefing paper says that Swaziland has become the world’s most unequal country, because of a “very poor mix of policies.”Swaziland’s “government has failed to put measures in place to tackle inequality, with poor scores for social and progressive taxation, and a poor record on labour rights,” the paper concludes. Read more of this post

Al magt til kongen

Udgangspunktet for ethvert ægte demokrati er adskillelse af den udøvende, lovgivende og dømmende magt, som vi har det i Danmark. I Swazilands såkaldte ”Swazi democracy” derimod, er alle tre magter styret af landets enevældige konge, Mswati III.

I demokratier som Danmark sikrer magtens tredeling, at der i princippet er vandtætte skodder mellem statsministeren, regeringen og den offentlige administration på den ene side, og folketinget og domstolene på den anden. Read more of this post

Sukker har en bitter eftersmag i Swaziland

En stor del af det lille enevældige kongedømme Swazilands indtjening kommer fra sukkerindustrien. Men mange af de fattige subsistensbønder i landets ”sukkerbælte” er blevet smidt væk fra deres jord, for at gøre plads til kongens storbrug.

I mange år har de fleste indbyggere i Swaziland været bange for at kritisere landets enevældige konge Mswati III offentligt. Dette kunne nemlig føre til alt fra tortur og fængselsstraf til at man fik frataget sin jord. Read more of this post

Socialist Youth call for democracy in Swaziland now

The International Union of Socialist Youth (IUSY) is calling for governments, regional bodies and multilaterals to pressurize the Swazi regime to introduce multiparty elections in the absolute monarchy of Swaziland.

“We are appealing to democratic governments, regional bodies, and multilateral institutions to raise the issue of Swaziland and hold the authoritarian regime accountable. We call for political and economic pressure on the regime … [and] a peaceful transition to democracy,” the IUSY wrote in a resolution passed at the IUSY World Council held in Rosario, Argentina last week. Read more of this post

Acting is best way to show solidarity with suffering people

bheki-dlamini2Introduce sanctions and boycotts against the repressive Swazi regime and help the democratic movement with everything from  legal assistance to torture counselling, organizational skills and information dissemination, says young Swazi activist.

Stories of incredible hardship, suffering and lack of democratic rights often overflow our social media feeds and are ever-present in our newspapers and on radio and TV. Read more of this post

The democratisation of Swaziland: inside or outside job?

swaziland-pudemo-2013-194The small absolute monarchy of Swaziland is best known for its tourism, “unique” culture tied to its monarchy, and the cultural and spending exploits of playboy-king Mswati III, not for its repressive regime and ongoing struggle for democracy.

Swaziland is nominally a middle income country that is seldom condemned by world leaders and rarely mentioned in the international media, even though it is one of the most unequal, poverty-stricken and unfree countries in the world, and even though King Mswati spends millions of dollars on prestige projects and personal jets while his subjects starve. Read more of this post

The bittersweet taste of Swazi sugar

screenhunter_4167-oct-27-21-36According to a new report from the ITUC about the sugar industry in Swaziland, the country’s absolute monarch uses sugar profits to sweeten his own life, leaving sugar-cane farmers and the majority of the population bitterly impoverished.

Sugar cane production has brought about more human suffering than development in Swaziland. Many people have been evicted and the general conditions in the sugar industry are atrocious. This is the conclusion of a new International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)-report, written by journalist Manqoba Nxumalo and human rights lawyer Sipho Gumedze. Read more of this post