Swaziland’s failed democratisation

The reason for the lack of democracy in the tiny absolute monarchy of Swaziland is an authoritarian reinvention of tradition, and a lack of both internal and external pressure on the regime, writes Swazi activist Bheki Dlamini.

If you are looking for books on political solutions in Swaziland in your local or university library, or in bookstores or on Amazon, you won’t find much to enlighten you. Read more of this post

Socialist Youth call for democracy in Swaziland now

The International Union of Socialist Youth (IUSY) is calling for governments, regional bodies and multilaterals to pressurize the Swazi regime to introduce multiparty elections in the absolute monarchy of Swaziland.

“We are appealing to democratic governments, regional bodies, and multilateral institutions to raise the issue of Swaziland and hold the authoritarian regime accountable. We call for political and economic pressure on the regime … [and] a peaceful transition to democracy,” the IUSY wrote in a resolution passed at the IUSY World Council held in Rosario, Argentina last week. Read more of this post

Zonke needs help to appeal unfair 15-year sentence

zonkeWhere is the campaign and help for the appeal of Swazi activist Zonke Dlamini, who was tortured and sentenced to 15 years under repressive terror laws three years ago, asks his co-accused, Bheki Dlamini, who was released without charge?

Activist Zonke Dlamini was sentenced to 15 years in prison three years ago, on February 28. 2014, for allegedly petrol bombing the houses of two Swazi officials, an MP and a high-ranking police officer. Read more of this post

Acting is best way to show solidarity with suffering people

bheki-dlamini2Introduce sanctions and boycotts against the repressive Swazi regime and help the democratic movement with everything from  legal assistance to torture counselling, organizational skills and information dissemination, says young Swazi activist.

Stories of incredible hardship, suffering and lack of democratic rights often overflow our social media feeds and are ever-present in our newspapers and on radio and TV. Read more of this post

The democratisation of Swaziland: inside or outside job?

swaziland-pudemo-2013-194The small absolute monarchy of Swaziland is best known for its tourism, “unique” culture tied to its monarchy, and the cultural and spending exploits of playboy-king Mswati III, not for its repressive regime and ongoing struggle for democracy.

Swaziland is nominally a middle income country that is seldom condemned by world leaders and rarely mentioned in the international media, even though it is one of the most unequal, poverty-stricken and unfree countries in the world, and even though King Mswati spends millions of dollars on prestige projects and personal jets while his subjects starve. Read more of this post

Do Swazis want democracy?

bheki_New Afrobarometer-report shows that Africans still cautiously embrace democracy. In the small absolute monarchy of Swaziland, support for democracy is low but rising. In many other countries it is falling.

‘Do Africans still want democracy,’ independent research network Afrobarometer asks Africans in a new report? The answer seems to be a cautious and qualified ‘yes’. In Swaziland, a small absolute monarchy where parties are banned and the king appoints the government and controls everything from the economy to the judiciary, numbers are very low but rising. Read more of this post

Swaziland: Antiterrorlov kendt forfatningsstridig

high-courtFredag blev dele af Swazilands antiterrorlov, som Amnesty International kalder ”undertrykkende,” kendt forfatningsstridig i landsretten i Mbabane. En ung demokratiforkæmper, der selv har mærket effekterne af loven, tror dog ikke, at dommen vil ændre meget.

I 2014 blev syv medlemmer af People’s United Democratic Movement (PUDEMO) arresteret, og anklaget for terrorisme i henhold til Swazilands antiterrorlov. De havde båret en t-shirt, med PUDEMOs logo i det lille enevældige monarki. Read more of this post